On the morning of April 6, 1970, 350 to 400 whites, mostly students, gathered outside of Collinwood High School and began throwing rocks at the school, breaking 56 windows. Teachers told the 200 black students who attended school that day to go to…

The Trailside Interpretation Center was built in 1971, and is currently known as the Rocky River Nature Center. Located in the Rocky River South Reservation, it is the paragon of naturalist interpretation and education within the Cleveland…

The Goodrich House was erected in 1897 and was founded by Flora Stone Mather. Mrs. Mather can be described as a pious women who was influenced by the establishment of other settlement houses in Cleveland, most notably the Hiram House. She named the…

In 1907, Hedwig Kosbab, a Hungarian immigrant's daughter, began teaching English to children on her porch. Four years later her organization was incorporated and became the East End Neighborhood House. The organization served the Buckeye, Woodland,…

Surrounded on three sides by the city of Cleveland, and bordered on the fourth side by Lake Erie, Bratenahl has remained to this day a secluded village. The village began as farmland in the early nineteenth century, owned by its namesake, Charles…

Rustling trees, wildlife, ponds, fountains, and bustling co-eds. The first impressions of Cuyahoga Community College's Western Campus would, most likely, not include hints of its significant military history. Wounded soldiers, German prisoners of…

Until 2013, the administrative headquarters of the Cleveland Board of Education was an iconic sandstone, Beaux-Arts structure located at 1380 East 6th Street on the east side of Mall A. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places since 1975,…

The 36 year old building with the boarded up windows and doors that stands today at East 79th Street and Superior Avenue is the second incarnation of Cleveland's famous East High School. East High School was coined a "20th-century schoolhouse" when…

The site of the North Royalton City School Board Offices and Gibson Field at Serpentini Stadium has been used by the community as school land for over 100 years. In 1908, North Royalton was a very different community than it is today, and this was…

The fight to desegregate schools in Cleveland in the post-World War II era led to a contentious and complicated debate in the city over the issues of race, freedom, and equality. Glenville's Stephen E. Howe Elementary School is central to the tale.…

Today, the Superior Schoolhouse is a property of the City of Cleveland Heights that serves as a repository for archival collections and a venue for educational programs relating to the city's history. However, the story of the schoolhouse goes…

Cleveland Heights High School, referred to simply as "Heights," originated in 1901 on the site of the present-day Boulevard Elementary School, near the intersection of Lee Road and Euclid Heights Boulevard. Cleveland Heights High School's first…

Cleveland's Catholic schoolchildren began attending parochial schools in their neighborhoods during the 1850s, opting to avoid the public school system which many saw as being anti-Catholic. These first Catholic schools were merely grammar schools,…

In 1904, the Cleveland Public Schools began a small school gardening program which quickly expanded into a multi-million dollar, district-wide deal. Generations of schoolchildren participated by growing food, beautifying vacant lots, and learning…

In February 2010 Tremont Elementary School narrowly avoided closure when Cleveland Metropolitan School District CEO Eugene Sanders vetoed a cost-cutting plan that targeted under-capacity schools. The problem’s genesis was city-wide: residents…

While the Cleveland-Marshall College of Law has been a part of Cleveland State University since 1969, its history as a Cleveland area law school dates back to the late nineteenth century. In 1897, Cleveland Law School was established, becoming…

In the days of horse-drawn carriages and booming industry, one street in Cleveland showcased the elite among the city's citizens. Millionaire's Row, a length of Euclid Avenue, was where prominent figures such as John D. Rockefeller, Marcus Hanna, and…

Shaw High School in East Cleveland opened in 1838 thanks to a donation made by Sarah Shaw after the death of her husband John. Since they had no children, she decided to give back to her rural community by donating some of the family's farmland for…

Desiring to place a public institution of higher learning within thirty miles of every Ohio resident, Governor James Rhodes proposed the establishment of a state university in Cleveland following a unanimous recommendation from the Ohio Board of…

The origins of Cleveland State University date back to 1870 when the Cleveland Young Men's Christian Association began offering free evening classes in French and German. Following a period of sporadic course offerings in the 1870s, the YMCA's…

The Cleveland Botanical Garden was founded as the Garden Center of Greater Cleveland in 1930, and was originally located in a boathouse at Wade Park Lagoon. Various horticultural exhibits of plants from all over the world are provided in the gardens.…

The Cleveland Institute of Art was founded in 1882 as the Western Reserve School of Design for Women. The school began very small, with only one student and one teacher, but it quickly grew. The school, despite its name, did a few male students and…

The Cleveland Institute of Music was founded in 1920 by a small group of backers who each contributed $1,000 to get the institute off the ground. Initially the school focused on student performance. Classes were first taught in the Statler Hotel,…

University Hospitals of Cleveland is a world-class, not-for-profit medical institution with close ties to Case Western Reserve University. Its roots go back to 1866, with the formation of the Cleveland City Hospital Association, a charitable society…

Land for the Cleveland Public School District's new commercial high school was originally acquired in 1907 along East 107th Street in University Circle. However, disputes and discussions about the nature and design of the new high school in the…

The Ark was a small, two-room frame house located on the northeast side of Public Square. It housed taxidermy ranging from birds to reptiles and mammals, which led to its being called the Ark in reference to the biblical story of saving the world's…

Designed by world famous architect Frank Gehry, the Peter B. Lewis Building's unique architectural features symbolize the Weatherhead School of Management's innovative approach to management education. The building takes its name from Peter B. Lewis,…

Case Western Reserve University traces its roots to Western Reserve College, founded in Hudson, Ohio in 1826. Industrialist Amasa Stone financed the college's move to Cleveland's University Circle in 1880 - the same year that the Case School of…

Founded in 1867, Western Reserve Historical Society is the oldest cultural institution in Northeast Ohio, the region's largest American history research center, and one of the leading genealogical research centers in the nation. Additionally, WRHS…

Social worker Jane Edna Hunter established the Phillis Wheatley Association - originally named the Working Girls Home Association - in 1911 to provide support and a safe place to stay for young, unmarried African-American girls who had recently…