If you walk down the north side of Euclid Avenue today, between East 9th and East 12th Streets, you can't help but notice the several dilapidated and vacant buildings between the 925 Building (formerly known as the Huntington Building, and before…

Soaring above a surfeit of drugstores, convenient marts and fast-food eateries a bell tower stands. The tower looms above the modern conveniences on Euclid Avenue, as testament to a different time. The tower once belonged to the parish of St. Agnes,…

On April 6, 1953, Dr. John Bruere, pastor of Calvary Presbyterian Church, mentioned that a "certain colored woman has been attending our services frequently of late." The appearance of an African American woman in the church's congregation "raised in…

In 1991 a derailed construction project had left an abundance of weeds and hills of mounded dirt in the vacant 19.3-acre lot that stretched from East 79th to East 84th Street between Euclid and Chester Avenues. The project to build a shopping center…

The Episcopal congregation of St. Paul's in Cleveland made its third stop on its eastbound journey at the southeast corner of Case Avenue (East 40th Street) and Euclid Avenue in 1876. Founded in 1846 at the American House Hotel at Superior Avenue and…

St. Paul's Episcopal Church emerged in 1846, beginning in rented space until its first dedicated building opened in 1848 at the corner of Sheriff Street (now East 4th) and Euclid Avenue on the site of the present-day House of Blues. Following a…

Imagine walking into this building located on Cleveland State University's campus near East 24th Street and Chester Avenue, and negotiating with a salesman to buy a Buick! Before it saw institutional use, this building constructed in 1924 was the…

Parker-Hannifin Hall was once a mansion owned by George Howe, Cleveland businessman and Cleveland Police Commissioner. Parker Hannifin Hall is one of the last surviving Millionaires' Row mansions. It is a small reminder of a bygone time when ornate…

The Cleveland State University Student Center is located on land that was in the nineteenth century the site of the Perry-Payne homestead. The property consisted of two mansions. One directly across the street from Trinity Cathedral was owned by…

In ninety years, three prominent Cleveland families have called 2540 Fairmount Boulevard home. The story of this house mirrors that of Euclid Golf, an early planned suburban development that benefited from the eastward spread of Cleveland's wealthy…

More than a century before it hosted ten-pin bowling matches, the southeast corner of Euclid Avenue and East 4th Street (then called Sheriff Street) offered operatic entertainment. Indeed, the Euclid Avenue Opera House, which opened on September 6,…

Imagine descending an escalator from Star Plaza and boarding a subway bound for Tower City Center. Mayor Tom Johnson first proposed a Cleveland subway in 1905, and the idea surfaced repeatedly thereafter. After several failed attempts between the…

The new May Company department store opened on Public Square in 1915. Containing over 800,000 square feet of floor space, it was said to be the third largest store in the nation. Built by world-famous architect and city planner Daniel Burnham (who…

Most people know about "The Arcade" in Cleveland. Some might be surprised, however, to find out that Downtown actually has at least two more of these incredible structures. Lying parallel to each other, The Colonial (1898) and Euclid (1911) arcades…

While the Cleveland-Marshall College of Law has been a part of Cleveland State University since 1969, its history as a Cleveland area law school dates back to the late nineteenth century. In 1897, Cleveland Law School was established, becoming…

In the days of horse-drawn carriages and booming industry, one street in Cleveland showcased the elite among the city's citizens. Millionaire's Row, a length of Euclid Avenue, was where prominent figures such as John D. Rockefeller, Marcus Hanna, and…

In the early 1990s, William Barrow, director of Cleveland State University's Cleveland Memory Project, discovered something interesting about his great uncle Thomas Cooper Barrow. Not only had Tom owned a driving range during the Great Depression,…

The Arena at 3717 Euclid Avenue was built in 1937 by sports promoter Albert C. Stuphin. Originally designed to be the home ice for Stuphin's Cleveland Barons hockey team (which until that point had played further up Euclid Avenue at the Elysium),…

Shaw High School in East Cleveland opened in 1838 thanks to a donation made by Sarah Shaw after the death of her husband John. Since they had no children, she decided to give back to her rural community by donating some of the family's farmland for…

Trinity Cathedral, the seat of the Episcopal Diocese of Ohio, was designed by "Millionaire's Row" architect Charles F. Schweinfurth and built in 1901-07 of Indiana limestone in the Gothic style. It is connected to an older parish house built in 1895…

Looking for a place to grab a stein of beer and show off your new lederhosen? Herman Pirchner's Alpine Village Theatrical Bar and Restaurant would have been the ideal place to do so. Inspired by Pirchner's childhood home in the Austrian Alps, Alpine…

Desiring to place a public institution of higher learning within thirty miles of every Ohio resident, Governor James Rhodes proposed the establishment of a state university in Cleveland following a unanimous recommendation from the Ohio Board of…

Playhouse Square emerged in 1921-22 with the opening of the State, Ohio, Allen, Palace, and Hanna theaters near the intersection of Euclid Avenue and East Fourteenth Street. The brainchild of Joseph Laronge, four of the five theaters were…

The origins of Cleveland State University date back to 1870 when the Cleveland Young Men's Christian Association began offering free evening classes in French and German. Following a period of sporadic course offerings in the 1870s, the YMCA's…

At their peak, Cleveland's downtown department stores anchored a lower Euclid Avenue that ranked among the largest retail districts in the United States and was compared to New York's stylish Fifth Avenue. Massive, multi-level stores (consisting of…

Euclid Avenue's "Millionaires' Row" was home to some of the nation's most powerful and influential industrialists, including John D. Rockefeller. Around the turn of the twentieth century, Baedeker's Travel Guide dubbed Euclid Avenue the "Showplace of…

Four Cleveland physicians founded the Cleveland Clinic Foundation in February 1921 with a desire to create an institution dedicated not only to medical care, but also to research, innovation, and physician education. Three of the four founders had…

The story of the Cleveland Play House begins in 1915 with a series of meetings held at the home of essayist Charles Brooks. The well-to-do Charles and his wife Minerva Brooks met each week with eight of their friends to discuss theatre and the arts.…

Following a stint distributing records for jukeboxes, Henry LoConti Sr. opened the first Agora in 1966 near Case Western Reserve University. After two more location changes the club ended up at its present location in 1984. Originally seen as a dance…