Filed Under Sports

Barrow's Hole In One Golf

In the early 1990s, William Barrow, director of Cleveland State University's Cleveland Memory Project, discovered something interesting about his great uncle Thomas Cooper Barrow. Not only had Tom owned a driving range during the Great Depression, but it was located along Euclid Avenue's once-ritzy Millionaires' Row, then in decline. Little is known of Thomas Cooper Barrow's "Hole in One Golf," except that it was situated on what was once the sprawling and elegant estate of oil tycoon Samuel Andrews. As the Andrews Estate and other mansions along Euclid Avenue were shuttered or demolished, the former "Showplace of America" made way for many new—and often fleeting—businesses. Barrow's golf range illustrates just one of many such businesses to spring up along the Avenue during its post-mansion period.

Audio

Millionaire's Row Driving Range William Barrow, Director of CSU's Cleveland Memory Project describes the significance of his great uncle's Euclid Avenue Driving Range Source: Cleveland Regional Oral History Collection
Businessman, Thomas Cooper Barrow William Barrow of CSU's Cleveland Memory Project recalls his great uncle who owned a driving range on Euclid Avenue in the 1930's Source: Cleveland Regional Oral History Collection

Images

Barrow's Hole in One Golf, ca. 1930s Source: Image courtesy of William Barrow and Family
Hole in One Golf, ca. 1930s Source: Image courtesy of William Barrow and Family
Relaxing at Hole in One Golf, ca. 1930s Source: Image courtesy of William Barrow and Family
Thomas Cooper Barrow, ca. 1900 Thomas Cooper Barrow as a young man, circa 1900. Source: Image courtesy of William Barrow and Family
Otis and Eells Mansions The Otis and the Eells estates were located next to Barrow's Hole in One Golf on Euclid Avenue. Source: Image Courtesy of William Barrow and Family
Samuel Andrews Estate ca. 1917 This site was the home of Thomas Cooper Barrow's Hole in One Golf during the 1930s. Millionaire oil baron Samuel Andrews built his massive mansion at great cost and difficulty over the years of 1882-1885. His goal was to build the grandest property on Millionaire's Row in hopes of hosting Queen Victoria of England. However, it was soon discovered that the design of the house, which included nearly 100 rooms, made it nearly impossible for the estate's many servants to function efficiently. The house, which came to be known as "Andrews' Folly," was abandoned in 1889 and demolished in 1923, making way for less ambitious ventures such as Barrow's golf range. Source: Image courtesy of William Barrow and Family
Daniel P. Eells Mansion The Eells Mansion was torn down in 1959. This mansion was one of several such properties that remained along Euclid Avenue for a time as businesses such as Thomas Barrow's driving range began to fill in the gaps in a declining Millionaire's Row. Thomas Cooper Barrow's Hole in One Golf was located adjacent to the Eells mansion. Source: Image courtesy of William Barrow and Family

Location

Metadata

“Barrow's Hole In One Golf,” Cleveland Historical, accessed May 26, 2022, https://clevelandhistorical.org/items/show/86.