The Salmon Halle Mansion

Located at 2701 Park Drive, the Salmon Halle Mansion is one of the most elegantly designed houses in Shaker Heights. Its design reflects the same elegance and sense of style which Salmon P. Halle, co-founder of the Halle Brothers department store, brought to his famed Cleveland area business.

Salmon P. Halle (1864-1949) was a second generation Jewish-American, whose father Moses immigrated to Cleveland from Bavaria in 1848--the year of revolutions in Europe. Moses was a savvy businessman who in 1864, together with his brother Manuel, developed a successful wholesale notions business on Water Street (W. 9th St.) in Cleveland. Moses passed his business acumen on to his sons Salmon and Samuel who founded the Halle Brothers department store on Superior Street in downtown Cleveland in 1891. Salmon and Samuel built upon the business skills of their father, adding class and elegance to their retail business venture. Halle Brothers soon came to be known as Cleveland's most elegant department store and retained that reputation for most of the twentieth century until the store closed in 1982.

In 1927, Salmon Halle hired John William Cresswell Corbusier to design his new home on Park Drive (formerly known as Park Drive Way) in Shaker Heights. Corbusier was a noted Cleveland architect who specialized in the design of churches. During the years 1913-1928, Corbusier designed eleven churches in northeast Ohio--all of which are still standing, including the Church of the Covenant in University Circle and the Church of the Savior in Cleveland Heights.

The mansion which Corbusier designed for Salmon Halle is one of the most notable in Shaker Heights. Situated on almost four acres of land, the mansion is built in late French Renaissance/Neoclassical style. It has more than 15,000 square feet of livable area. The mansion features glass entrance doors flanked by lanterns, gable dormers with volutes (spiral scroll-like ornaments), quoins (cornerstones) and voussoirs (wedge-shaped elements that form an arch) above windows. There are quoins at the corner and iron railings. The windows and doors have wide stone surrounds set within smoothly dressed stone walls.

Members of the Halle family resided in the Salmon Halle mansion in Shaker Heights from 1929, when the two year long construction of the home was completed, until 1965, when Salmon Halle's widow Carrie died and the home was sold out of her estate.

On August 23, 1976, the Salmon Halle mansion was designated a Shaker Heights landmark.

Images

The Salmon Halle Mansion

The Salmon Halle Mansion

This photograph of the Salmon Halle Mansion at 2701 Park Drive reflects the same elegance which epitomized the Halles Bros. department store, one of downtown Cleveland's classiest department stores in the twentieth century. Construction of the Salmon Halle mansion, which has more than 15,000 square feet of livable area, was begun in 1927 and completed in 1929. Image courtesy of the Shaker Historical Society View File Details Page

John William Cresswell Corbusier (1873-1978), shown in this 1911 photo from the Ohio Architect and Builder journal, was one of Cleveland's most notable architects of the early twentieth century. He specialized in church designs and designed eleven churches in northeast Ohio during the period 1913-1928. His career was tragically cut short by his sudden and untimely death at age 49 in 1928, the year before construction of the Salmon Halle mansion was completed. View File Details Page

Church of the Savior

Church of the Savior

John William Cresswell Corbusier was the architect for the Church of the Savior located on Lee Road in Cleveland Heights. The church, shown in this undated postcard, was the last church designed by Corbusier before his untimely death in 1928.. Image courtesy of Cleveland State University Library, Special Collections. View File Details Page

An Untimely Death for a Famed Architect

An Untimely Death for a Famed Architect

This article from the June 9, 1928 edition of the Cleveland Plain Dealer announces the death of famed Cleveland architect John William Cresswell Corbusier. Corbusier, who lived in Hudson, Ohio, collapsed on a dance floor while dancing with his wife. He died from a massive heart attack. He was 49 years old at the time of his death. Image courtesy of Cleveland State University Library, Special Collections. View File Details Page

Salmon P. Halle (1866-1949)

Salmon P. Halle (1866-1949)

Salmon Halle was the oldest son of pioneer Cleveland merchant Moses Halle, a Jew who immigrated from Germany to Cleveland in 1848, the year of Revolutions in Europe. Salmon and his brother Samuel founded the Halle Bros. department store in downtown Cleveland in 1891. Salmon Halle moved to Shaker Heights in 1929 and resided there for the next two decades until his death in 1949. Image courtesy of Cleveland Public Library Photograph Collection. View File Details Page

Halle Bros. Department Store Addition

Halle Bros. Department Store Addition

In 1926, the renowned architectural firm of Walker and Weeks drew this sketch for the proposed addition to the Halle Bros. department store, to be located to the south of the main store, between Huron and Prospect Avenues. The addition was completed in 1928. Image courtesy of the Cleveland Public Library Photograph Collection. View File Details Page

Elegance and Class

Elegance and Class

This undated photograph presents a compelling view of the downtown Halle Bros. department store from an interior balcony. Halle Bros. department store epitomized elegance and class in retail shopping in downtown Cleveland for close to 100 years. Image courtesy of Cleveland State University Library, Special Collections. View File Details Page

Enjoying the Garden

Enjoying the Garden

In this 1930 photograph, Carrie B. Halle, the wife of Halle Brothers department store co-founder Salmon P. Halle, enjoys the elaborate garden in the backyard of her home at 2701 Park Drive in Shaker Heights. She is joined in this photo by three of her grandchildren. Image courtesy of Cleveland Public Library Photograph Collection. View File Details Page

Cite this Page:

Jim Dubelko, “The Salmon Halle Mansion,” Cleveland Historical, accessed June 28, 2017, https://clevelandhistorical.org/items/show/424.
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