Filed Under Museums

Western Reserve Historical Society

Founded in 1867, Western Reserve Historical Society is the oldest cultural institution in Northeast Ohio, the region's largest American history research center, and one of the leading genealogical research centers in the nation. Additionally, WRHS operates the Hale Farm and Village interpretive site in Bath, Ohio, Shandy Hall in Geneva, Ohio, and Loghurst in Canfield, Ohio.

The historical society collects, preserves, and presents the history of the Western Reserve, including Cleveland. It houses the Crawford Auto-Aviation Museum, the Halle Costume Wing, the Hay-McKinney Mansion, and the WRHS Library.

Originally located in the Society for Savings Bank building on Public Square, the historical society moved to Euclid and East 107th Street in 1892. In the late 1930s WRHS moved into the two mansions in University Circle where it still resides.

Audio

The Historic Location of WRHS John Grabowski explains the connection between Euclid Avenue's Millionaires' Row and Western Reserve Historical Society Source: Cleveland Regional Oral History Collection
Moving to University Circle John Grabowski on the Western Reserve Historical Society's move from Public Square to University Circle Source: Cleveland Regional Oral History Collection
History is Just a Second Away Newscaster Leon Bibb on the Western Reserve Historical Society Source: Cleveland Regional Oral History Collection 

Images

Map of Northeast Ohio, ca. 1770s In 1772, John Gottlieb Ernestus Heckewelder, an English-born Moravian Missionary, ventured into the Western Reserve Territories, eventually settling the village of Schoenbrunn as a refuge for Native Americans who had converted to Christianity. During the Revolutionary War, Heckewelder and other Moravians declared neutrality in the conflict, leading to a trial in which the group was charged with treason by the British colonial government. While Heckewelder was on trial in Detroit, Pennsylvania Militiamen entered the Moravian-settled town of Gnadenhutten and slaughtered 96 Christian Delawares in what came to be known as the "Gnadenhutten Massacre." This map is one of many relics of the Western Reserve era of Ohio history that can be found at WRHS. Source: Western Reserve Historical Society Date: 1770s
Women At Republic Steel, 1942 During World War II, women contributed to the war effort by taking manufacturing jobs left vacant when young American men were sent overseas to fight the war. This wartime experience not only helped the Allies win the war, but also led to greater acceptance of women entering the post-war workplace. This photo is part of the extensive LTV Steel Collection at WRHS. Source: Western Reserve Historical Society Date: 1942
Schlather Family, ca. 1900 Western Reserve Historical Society is one of the largest genealogy and family research centers in the nation. Source: Western Reserve Historical Society Date: 1900
Jordan Sport Salon Ad An advertisement for the Little Custom Jordan Sport Salon, one of the first compact cars, introduced in 1927. The Jordan Motor Car Company was among the automobile manufacturers that made Cleveland the nation's first automotive capital. The company advertised the Little Custom Jordan as "a wonderful car for a woman" suggesting the appeal to women so common in 1920s advertising. Western Reserve Historical Society is home to the Crawford Auto-Aviation Museum, which maintains a world-renowned collection of early cars, including Jordans. Source: Western Reserve Historical Society
Hope Bridge Stonecutters Stone carvers sitting atop one of four "Guardians of Traffic," which were transportation-themed Art Deco pylons crafted to crown the supports of the Lorain-Carnegie Bridge in 1932. After extensive upgrades to its roadway in the early 1980s, the bridge reopened as Hope Memorial Bridge in tribute to the family of Cleveland-born entertainer Bob Hope, many of whom were stonemasons. Source: Western Reserve Historical Society
Call And Post Newsboys Newsboys pose in front of the offices of the Cleveland Call & Post, Cleveland's leading African American newspaper with the merger of The Call and The Post in 1927. Under the direction of William O. Walker, the Call & Post grew impressively in size and circulation. Western Reserve Historical Society's collection maintains a notable African American Archives. Source: Western Reserve Historical Society
National Air Races Decal, 1932 The National Air Races were held in Cleveland along the lakefront most years between 1929 and 1949. A devastating plane crash in Berea during a 1949 event led a number of local municipalities to ban air racing over their cities, and the great event ended for more than a decade before being reintroduced as the Cleveland National Air Show in 1964. WRHS preserves a visual record of the air show's early history. Source: Western Reserve Historical Society Date: 1932
Charles Lindbergh, 1929 National Air Races Charles Lindbergh at the 1929 National Air Races in Cleveland, Ohio. Source: Western Reserve Historical Society Date: 1929

Location

10825 Magnolia Dr, Cleveland, OH 44106

Metadata

“Western Reserve Historical Society,” Cleveland Historical, accessed June 29, 2022, https://clevelandhistorical.org/items/show/32.